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Understanding the Intervention Project for Nurses Monitoring Contract

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If you are a nurse (i.e. LPN, RN, APRN, etc) and have decided to participate in the Intervention Project for Nurses (“IPN”) you will first have to undergo an evaluation, which will include an interview with an IPN approved doctor and a toxicology test. After this evaluation has been completed, IPN may suggest no monitoring or require that you enter into a monitoring contract. Typically, you have roughly two weeks to sign the monitoring contract. Prior to signing the contract, you should thoroughly review the IPN Participant Manual so that you understand the requirements for participation. The last thing you want is to comply with the monitoring contract only to have your contract extended or have your case referred to the Board of Nursing because you failed to adhere to the Participant Manual’s requirements.

AHCA Application for Exemption from Disqualification

If you are reading this article it means that you have probably received a letter from the Agency for Healthcare Administration (“AHCA”) stating that they have uncovered criminal offenses that disqualify you from working for a health care provider. AHCA may have uncovered this offense a result of background screening submitted as part of the employment process for a health care provider and/or participation as a Medicaid provider. This applies to clinical staff as well as facility owners, administrators and chief financial officers and those seeking enrollment as a provider in the Florida Medicaid program. Fear not, because you may be eligible to file an Exemption from Disqualification if you meet certain criteria.

Am I Eligible for Exemption?

Our firm can assist you with demonstrating to AHCA by clear and convincing evidence that an exemption from disqualification should be granted. The application will only be reviewed once all relevant supporting documents are received by AHCA. You are only eligible for Exemption from Disqualification if:

  1. You have been lawfully released from confinement, supervision or other nonmonetary condition imposed by the court for a disqualifying misdemeanor criminal offense;
  2. At least 3 years after you have been lawfully released from confinement, supervision, or other nonmonetary condition imposed by the court for a disqualifying felony criminal offense;
  3. You have completed any court-ordered fee, fine, fund, lien, civil judgment, application, costs of prosecution, trust, or restitution as part of the judgment and sentence for any disqualifying felony or misdemeanor in full; and
  4. If you have been designated as a sexual predator, sexual offender or career offender you are not eligible for an exemption from Disqualification.

 

Filing the Application

Filling out the application can be a bit tricky, so you should definitely hire a health law attorney that has experience with doing so in order to prevent delays in processing your application. In addition to completing the Application for Exemption from Disqualification you will need to provide AHCA with the following:

  1. Current Level II Screening;
  2. Arrest Reports;
  3. Court Dispositions;
  4. Signed Statement (only if you cannot obtain the arrest report and/or court disposition);
  5. Probation and/or Parole records;
  6. Letters of Reference; and
  7. Documentation of Rehabilitation

It is important to note that when you apply for exemption you must provide all arrest reports, including those that were not specifically listed in the notice that you received from AHCA. You will also need to provide all court dispositions no matter the plea, judgment, verdict or even if it was sealed or expunged from your record. All of these documents will need to be neatly organized and AHCA must receive the documents within 30 days from receipt of its letter. It may take a little bit of legwork to retrieve these documents, so it is important to contact our firm as soon as possible so that we don’t miss the deadline. AHCA rarely grants extensions for filing the application.

Finally, if you are a certified or licensed healthcare professional you may also have to file an application for exemption with the Florida Department of Health (“DOH”). Florida Statute 408.809(7)(a) states that AHCA may grant an exemption from disqualification to a person who is subject to this section and who: (1) Does not have an active professional license or certification from the DOH; or (2) has an active professional license or certification from the DOH but is not providing a service within the scope of that license or certification.You may also have to submit a signed background screening privacy policy acknowledging receipt of the privacy policy. Once the DOH receives your application they will review it and make a decision as long as that person is working in the scope of their license or certification.

What Happens After Filing?

Once AHCA received the documents, it will be transferred to the Exemption Team and assigned to one of their analysts. As stated earlier, the analyst is looking for clear and convincing evidence that the employee should not be disqualified from employment. The Agency will consider the following:

  • The circumstances surrounding the criminal incident(s) for which an exemption is sought;
  • The time period that has elapsed since the incident(s);
  • The nature of the harm caused to the victim;
  • The history of the employee since the incident(s);
  • Any other evidence or circumstances indicating that the employee will not present a danger if employed or continued employment is allowed; and
  • Whether the applicant has been arrested for or convicted of another crime, even if that crime is not a disqualifying offense.

Once you’ve submitted your application it takes approximately 30 days for AHCA to render its decision to you. Exemptions granted by one agency will be considered by other agencies, but it is not binding on subsequent agencies. It is possible for AHCA and DOH to deny your application even though you feel you meet the criteria for an exemption. In those instances, our firm will represent you before AHCA and DOH Boards if you chose to contest the Agency decision. You have 21 days from the date you sign for the certified letter to request an appeal. The administrative law judge will only decide whether the agency’s intended action is an abuse of discretion.

Job Status

Are you allowed to continue to work for your employer after you’ve submitted the application for Exemption from Disqualification? It depends on the circumstances. If you were screened and hired by your current employer on or before June 30, 2014 and this disqualification was due to a rescreening by the same employer, you may continue work if you meet all of the following criteria:

  1. You are eligible to apply for exemption;
  2. Your disqualifying offense was not disqualifying at the time of your last screening, but is now disqualifying and was committed before the date of your last screening;
  3. Your employer agrees that you may continue working; and
  4. You submit your application timely.

According to Florida Statute, 408.809(4) an employee may continue to perform her duties and her employer may continue to allow her to have contact with any vulnerable person (i.e. physical therapy patients) that would place employee in a role that requires background screening while her application for exemption from disqualification by the agency is being processed and under review. You also must make sure that your license stays active if you are a licensed healthcare provider, which means that you should submit any renewal forms and correct any omissions to prevent your license from expiring.

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It should be noted that I am not your lawyer (unless you have presently retained my services through a retainer agreement). This post is not intended as legal advice, it is purely educational and informational, and no attorney-client relationship shall result after reading it. Please consult your own attorney for legal advice. If you do not have one and would like to retain my legal services please contact me using the contact information listed above.

All of the information and references made to laws, rules, regulations, and advisory opinions were accurate based on the law as it existed at this time, but laws are constantly evolving. Please contact me to be sure that the law which will govern your business is current. Thank you.

Florida v. Oxycodone, et. al.

Saamia Shaikh, Esquire has had her article “Florida v. Oxycodone, et. al.” published in the Winter 2017 edition of the Florida Bar Health Law Section’s Newsletter.

http://www.flabarhls.org/resources-menu/document-library/hls-newsletter/320-the-florida-bar-health-law-section-newsletter-winter-2017

For more information about any of the information contained in this article or any other questions please email Ms. Shaikh at ss@joneshealthlaw.com.

Which Business Structure is Best for my Medical Practice?

Which Business Structure is Best for my Medical Practice?

Over the years many providers have come to my office expressing an interest in owning a medical practice, healthcare facility, or healthcare business. During these meetings, it is important to obtain pertinent background information about the healthcare entity followed by a discussion about some of the regulatory and licensing issues that may arise. Equally important is determining how the healthcare entity should be structured for asset protection and tax purposes. A corporate healthcare attorney like myself can determine whether it is best for you to create a corporation, LLC, or an LLP. Admittedly, some of the more complex tax issues should be discussed with an attorney that specializes in tax law. Here is an overview of some of the basic differences between the different business entities.

Sole Proprietorship

An individual who does not create an entity.

  • No taxes are imposed on the entity. Instead, the individual owner reports the income and pays the income taxes.

Professional Corporation (a/k/a “P.A.”):

A corporation in which one or more shareholders must be licensed professionals (or entities that themselves are wholly-owned by licensed professionals). The P.A. can be taxed either as an S Corporation or as a C Corporation.

 

Corporation:

A corporation whose owner is not limited solely to licensed professionals. The corporation can be taxed either as an S Corporation or as a C Corporation.

  • C Corporation: Unless it elects otherwise, a corporation must report its own income and pay its own income taxes, under Subchapter C of the Internal Revenue Code.
    • A C Corporation is also subject to Florida’s state corporate income tax at a rate of 5.5%. Any distributions of its earnings to its shareholders requires the shareholders to recognize dividend income, resulting in a second layer or taxation.
    • Many professional C Corporations attempt to avoid distributing dividends by paying all income as compensation (because although it is still taxable to the recipient employee/shareholder, the C corporation gets a deduction for such compensation, resulting in one-layer of taxation).
    • If a C corporation pays excessive compensation, the IRS may try to treat some of the compensation as a dividend distribution and deny the deduction to the corporation with respect to such imputed dividend.

LLLP

A limited liability limited partnership comprised of at least one general partner and at least one limited partner, which is created by filing a Certificate of Limited Partnership and indicated LLLP status in such certificate. The status provides a general liability shield for all of the general partners.

S Corporation

No tax generally imposed on a corporation that elects to be treated as an “S Corporation” under Subchapter S of the Code. Rather, the tax consequences flow-through to the shareholder(s).

  • Each shareholder reports his or her pro rata share of the tax consequences based on his or her ownership in the S corporation and pays the income tax at his or her effective personal income tax rate.
  • Any distribution to the shareholder(s) is not treated as a dividend, but rather first is a return of basis and then excess is capital gain: provided, however, if the S corporation was formerly a C corporation within the past 10 years and had earnings and profits, then a portion of the distributions of the S corporation could be subject to tax as a dividend (Rather than a return of basis).
  • Shareholder distributions:
    • must be made in the ratio or ownership;
    • can be abused to “save” payroll taxes applicable to compensation; and
    • lack the asset protection potential of compensation payable to the head of a family under Florida law.
    • A P.A. generally should elect to be taxed as an S corporation, preferably from inception.
    • If a corporation has already been taxed as a C corporation, then conversion to S Corporation status must be carefully considered to ensure that the “built-in gains” tax on unrealized receivables can be handled through proper accrual and payment of accounts payable and compensation.

Professional Limited Liability Company (a/k/a “P.L.”)

A limited liability company in which one or more members must be licensed professionals (or entities that themselves are wholly-owned by licensed professionals). The P.L. can be taxed either as a disregarded entity (if there is only one member), as a partnership (if there is more than one member), or an S Corporation (whether it has one or more members.)

LLC

A limited liability company whose ownership is not limited solely to licensed professionals. The LLC can be taxed either as a disregarded entity, a partnership or an S corporation.

General Partnership

An entity that is comprised of two or more general partners. No written document is necessary to create a general partnership.

LLP

A limited liability partnership is comprised of two or more general partners, which registers with the state by filing a Statement of Qualification. The registration provides a general liability shield for all of the partners.

Limited Partnership

An entity comprised of at least one general partner and at least one limited partner, which is created upon the filing of a Certificate of Limited Partnership with the state.

There are many factors to consider when deciding how to structure your medical practice or healthcare entity. You should obtain an in-depth analysis of the various business structures so that you can choose the best one suited for your needs. While it is not impossible to change from one business entity type to another, it is always best to choose the best structure from the very beginning. A capable attorney at Jones Health Law, P.A. would be happy to guide you through this process.

***This blog post does not constitute legal advice and is only intended for educational purposes. You should consult a licensed attorney in the State of Florida that specializes in healthcare law.***

Annual Meeting of The Florida Society of Anesthesiologists

Jamaal R. Jones recently attended the Annual Meeting of the Florida Society of Anesthesiologists at the Breakers Hotel in Palm Beach, Florida.

The end goal of the meeting was for participants to:

1. Assess the potential application of emerging issues and advances that affect the practice of anesthesia; and

2. Apply contemporary practice management skills and knowledge of regulatory issues to the efficient and safe delivery of patient care.

If you are an Anesthesiologist, Anesthesiologist Assistant, or Nurse Anesthetist and would like to find out the various ways in which Jones Health Law can be of assistance to please contact us!

What Are My Options If I’ve Been Wrongfully Terminated From My Hospital Residency Program?

If you are discharged from a medical residency program it is important to examine the language contained in the hospital policies and procedure manual. In the manual it will explain the procedure for internal disciplinary action taken against hospital staff, which may require a mandatory board hearing depending on the alleged infraction. Prior to the board hearing, a neutral intermediary may be utilized so that direct communication between the hospital and the resident is limited. The disciplinary board may be comprised of a three-person panel where you can choose to present your defense. I would advise against signing any documents presented to you by the hospital after you have received written notice of the disciplinary hearing until you have spoken to an attorney with experience in health and employment law.